A tale of cylinders and shadows

Like I wrote before, we at Collabora have been working on improving WebKitGTK+ performance for customer projects, such as Apertis. We took the opportunity brought by recent improvements to WebKitGTK+ and GTK+ itself to make the final leg of drawing contents to screen as efficient as possible. And then we went on investigating why so much CPU was still being used in some of our test cases.

The first weird thing we noticed is performance was actually degraded on Wayland compared to running under X11. After some investigation we found a lot of time was being spent inside GTK+, painting the window’s background.

Here’s the thing: the problem only showed under Wayland because in that case GTK+ is responsible for painting the window decorations, whereas in the X11 case the window manager does it. That means all of that expensive blurring and rendering of shadows fell on GTK+’s lap.

During the web engines hackfest, a couple of months ago, I delved deeper into the problem and noticed, with Carlos Garcia’s help, that it was even worse when HiDPI displays were thrown into the mix. The scaling made things unbearably slower.

You might also be wondering why would painting of window decorations be such a problem, anyway? They should only be repainted when a window changes size or state anyway, which should be pretty rare, right? Right, that is one of the reasons why we had to make it fast, though: the resizing experience was pretty terrible. But we’ll get back to that later.

So I dug into that, made a few tries at understanding the issue and came up with a patch showing how applying the blur was being way too expensive. After a bit of discussion with our own Pekka Paalanen and Benjamin Otte we found the root cause: a fast path was not being hit by pixman due to the difference in scale factors on the shadow mask and the target surface. We made the shadow mask scale the same as the surface’s and voilà, sane performance.

I keep talking about this being a performance problem, but how bad was it? In the following video you can see how huge the impact in performance of this problem was on my very recent laptop with a HiDPI display. The video starts with an Epiphany window running with a patched GTK+ showing a nice demo the WebKit folks cooked for CSS animations and 3D transforms.

After a few seconds I quickly alt-tab to the version running with unpatched GTK+ – I made the window the exact size and position of the other one, so that it is under the same conditions and the difference can be seen more easily. It is massive.

Yes, all of that slow down was caused by repainting window shadows! OK, so that solved the problem for HiDPI displays, made resizing saner, great! But why is GTK+ repainting the window even if only the contents are changing, anyway? Well, that turned out to be an off-by-one bug in the code that checks whether the invalidated area includes part of the window decorations.

If the area being changed spanned the whole window width, say, it would always cause the shadows to be repainted. By fixing that, we now avoid all of the shadow drawing code when we are running full-window animations such as the CSS poster circle or gtk3-demo’s pixbufs demo.

As you can see in the video below, the gtk3-demo running with the patched GTK+ (the one on the right) is using a lot less CPU and has smoother animation than the one running with the unpatched GTK+ (left).

Pretty much all of the overhead caused by window decorations is gone in the patched version. It is still using quite a bit of CPU to animate those pixbufs, though, so some work still remains. Also, the overhead added to integrate cairo and GL rendering in GTK+ is pretty significant in the WebKitGTK+ CSS animation case. Hopefully that’ll get much better from GTK+ 4 onwards.

Web Engines Hackfest 2016!

I had a great time last week and the web engines hackfest! It was the 7th web hackfest hosted by Igalia and the 7th hackfest I attended. I’m almost a local Galician already. Brazilian Portuguese being so close to Galician certainly helps! Collabora co-sponsored the event and it was great that two colleagues of mine managed to join me in attendance.

It had great talks that will eventually end up in videos uploaded to the web site. We were amazed at the progress being made to Servo, including some performance results that blew our minds. We also discussed the next steps for WebKitGTK+, WebKit for Wayland (or WPE), our own Clutter wrapper to WebKitGTK+ which is used for the Apertis project, and much more.

Zan giving his talk on WPE (former WebKitForWayland)
Zan giving his talk on WPE (former WebKitForWayland)

One thing that drew my attention was how many Dell laptops there were. Many collaborans (myself included) and igalians are now using Dells, it seems. Sure, there were thinkpads and macbooks, but there was plenty of inspirons and xpses as well. It’s interesting how the brand make up shifted over the years since 2009, when the hackfest could easily be mistaken with a thinkpad shop.

Back to the actual hackfest: with the recent release of Gnome 3.22 (and Fedora 25 nearing release), my main focus was on dealing with some regressions suffered by users experienced after a change that made putting the final rendering composited by the nested Wayland compositor we have inside WebKitGTK+ to the GTK+ widget so it is shown on the screen.

One of the main problems people reported was applications that use WebKitGTK+ not showing anything where the content was supposed to appear. It turns out the problem was caused by GTK+ not being able to create a GL context. If the system was simply not able to use GL there would be no problem: WebKit would then just disable accelerated compositing and things would work, albeit slower.

The problem was WebKit being able to use an older GL version than the minimum required by GTK+. We fixed it by testing that GTK+ is able to create GL contexts before using the fast path, falling back to the slow glReadPixels codepath if not. This way we keep accelerated compositing working inside WebKit, which gives us nice 3D transforms and less repainting, but take the performance hit in the final “blit”.

Introducing "WebKitClutterGTK+"
Introducing “WebKitClutterGTK+”

Another issue we hit was GTK+ not properly updating its knowledge of the window’s opaque region when painting a frame with GL, which led to some really interesting issues like a shadow appearing when you tried to shrink the window. There was also an issue where the window would not use all of the screen when fullscreen which was likely related. Both were fixed.

André Magalhães also worked on a couple of patches we wrote for customer projects and are now pushing upstream. One enables the use of more than one frontend to connect to a remote web inspector server at once. This can be used to, for instance, show the regular web inspector on a browser window and also use IDE integration for setting breakpoints and so on.

The other patch was cooked by Philip Withnall and helped us deal with some performance bottlenecks we were hitting. It improves the performance of painting scroll bars. WebKitGTK+ does its own painting of scrollbars (we do not use the GTK+ widgets for various reasons). It turns out painting scrollbars can be quite a hit when the page is being scrolled fast, if not done efficiently.

Emanuele Aina had a great time learning more about meson to figure out a build issue we had when a more recent GStreamer was added to our jhbuild environment. He came out of the experience rather sane, which makes me think meson might indeed be much better than autotools.

Igalia 15 years cake
Igalia 15 years cake

It was a great hackfest, great seeing everyone face to face. We were happy to celebrate Igalia’s 15 years with them. Hope to see everyone again next year =)

WebKitGTK+ 2.14 and the Web Engines Hackfest

Next week our friends at Igalia will be hosting this year’s Web Engines Hackfest. Collabora will be there! We are gold sponsors, and have three developers attending. It will also be an opportunity to celebrate Igalia’s 15th birthday \o/. Looking forward to meet you there! =)

Carlos Garcia has recently released WebKitGTK+ 2.14, the latest stable release. This is a great release that brings a lot of improvements and works much better on Wayland, which is becoming mature enough to be used by default. In particular, it fixes the clipboard, which was one of the main missing features, thanks to Carlos Garnacho! We have also been able to contribute a bit to this release =)

One of the biggest changes this cycle is the threaded compositor, which was implemented by Igalia’s Gwang Yoon Hwang. This work improves performance by not stalling other web engine features while compositing. Earlier this year we contributed fixes to make the threaded compositor work with the web inspector and fixed elements, helping with the goal of enabling it by default for this release.

Wayland was also lacking an accelerated compositing implementation. There was a patch to add a nested Wayland compositor to the UIProcess, with the WebProcesses connecting to it as Wayland clients to share the final rendering so that it can be shown to screen. It was not ready though and there were questions as to whether that was the way to go and alternative proposals were floating around on how to best implement it.

At last year’s hackfest we had discussions about what the best path for that would be where collaborans Emanuele Aina and Daniel Stone (proxied by Emanuele) contributed quite a bit on figuring out how to implement it in a way that was both efficient and platform agnostic.

We later picked up the old patchset, rebased on the then-current master and made it run efficiently as proof of concept for the Apertis project on an i.MX6 board. This was done using the fancy GL support that landed in GTK+ in the meantime, with some API additions and shortcuts to sidestep performance issues. The work was sponsored by Robert Bosch Car Multimedia.

Igalia managed to improve and land a very well designed patch that implements the nested compositor, though it was still not as efficient as it could be, as it was using glReadPixels to get the final rendering of the page to the GTK+ widget through cairo. I have improved that code by ensuring we do not waste memory when using HiDPI.

As part of our proof of concept investigation, we got this WebGL car visualizer running quite well on our sabrelite imx6 boards. Some of it went into the upstream patches or proposals mentioned below, but we have a bunch of potential improvements still in store that we hope to turn into upstreamable patches and advance during next week’s hackfest.

One of the improvements that already landed was an alternate code path that leverages GTK+’s recent GL super powers to render using gdk_cairo_draw_from_gl(), avoiding the expensive copying of pixels from the GPU to the CPU and making it go faster. That improvement exposed a weird bug in GTK+ that causes a black patch to appear when shrinking the window, which I have a tentative fix for.

We originally proposed to add a new gdk_cairo_draw_from_egl() to use an EGLImage instead of a GL texture or renderbuffer. On our proof of concept we noticed it is even more efficient than the texturing currently used by GTK+, and could give us even better performance for WebKitGTK+. Emanuele Bassi thinks it might be better to add EGLImage as another code branch inside from_gl() though, so we will look into that.

Another very interesting igalian addition to this release is support for the MemoryPressureHandler even on systems with no cgroups set up. The memory pressure handler is a WebKit feature which flushes caches and frees resources that are not being used when the operating system notifies it memory is scarce.

We worked with the Raspberry Pi Foundation to add support for that feature to the Raspberry Pi browser and contributed it upstream back in 2014, when Collabora was trying to squeeze as much as possible from the hardware. We had to add a cgroups setup to wrap Epiphany in, back then, so that it would actually benefit from the feature.

With this improvement, it will benefit even without the custom cgroups setups as well, by having the UIProcess monitor memory usage and notify each WebProcess when memory is tight.

Some of these improvements were achieved by developers getting together at the Web Engines Hackfest last year and laying out the ground work or ideas that ended up in the code base. I look forward to another great few days of hackfest next week! See you there o/

Web Engines Hackfest 2014

For the 6th year in a row, Igalia has organized a hackfest focused on web engines. The 5 years before this one were actually focused on the GTK+ port of WebKit, but the number of web engines that matter to us as Free Software developers and consultancies has grown, and so has the scope of the hackfest.

It was a very productive and exciting event. It has already been covered by Manuel RegoPhilippe Normand, Sebastian Dröge and Andy Wingo! I am sure more blog posts will pop up. We had Martin Robinson telling us about the new Servo engine that Mozilla has been developing as a proof of concept for both Rust as a language for building big, complex products and for doing layout in parallel. Andy gave us a very good summary of where JS engines are in terms of performance and features. We had talks about CSS grid layouts, TyGL – a GL-powered implementation of the 2D painting backend in WebKit, the new Wayland port, announced by Zan Dobersek, and a lot more.

With help from my colleague ChangSeok OH, I presented a description of how a team at Collabora led by Marco Barisione made the combination of WebKitGTK+ and GNOME’s web browser a pretty good experience for the Raspberry Pi. It took a not so small amount of both pragmatic limitations and hacks to get to a multi-tab browser that can play youtube videos and be quite responsive, but we were very happy with how well WebKitGTK+ worked as a base for that.

One of my main goals for the hackfest was to help drive features that were lingering in the bug tracker for WebKitGTK+. I picked up a patch that had gone through a number of iterations and rewrites: the HTML5 notifications support, and with help from Carlos Garcia, managed to finish it and land it at the last day of the hackfest! It provides new signals that can be used to authorize notifications, show and close them.

To make notifications work in the best case scenario, the only thing that the API user needs to do is handle the permission request, since we provide a default implementation for the show and close signals that uses libnotify if it is available when building WebKitGTK+. Originally our intention was to use GNotification for the default implementation of those signals in WebKitGTK+, but it turned out to be a pain to use for our purposes.

GNotification is tied to GApplication. This allows for some interesting features, like notifications being persistent and able to reactivate the application, but those make no sense in our current use case, although that may change once service workers become a thing. It can also be a bit problematic given we are a library and thus have no GApplication of our own. That was easily overcome by using the default GApplication of the process for notifications, though.

The show stopper for us using GNotification was the way GNOME Shell currently deals with notifications sent using this mechanism. It will look for a .desktop file named after the application ID used to initialize the GApplication instance and reject the notification if it cannot find that. Besides making this a pain to test – our test browser would need a .desktop file to be installed, that would not work for our main API user! The application ID used for all Web instances is org.gnome.Epiphany at the moment, and that is not the same as any of the desktop files used either by the main browser or by the web apps created with it.

For the future we will probably move Epiphany towards this new era, and all users of the WebKitGTK+ API as well, but the strictness of GNOME Shell would hurt the usefulness of our default implementation right now, so we decided to stick to libnotify for the time being.

Other than that, I managed to review a bunch of patches during the hackfest, and took part in many interesting discussions regarding the next steps for GNOME Web and the GTK+ and Wayland ports of WebKit, such as the potential introduction of a threaded compositor, which is pretty exciting. We also tried to have Bastien Nocera as a guest participant for one of our sessions, but it turns out that requires more than a notebook on top of a bench hooked up to   a TV to work well. We could think of something next time ;D.

I’d like to thank Igalia for organizing and sponsoring the event, Collabora for sponsoring and sending ChangSeok and myself over to Spain from far away Brazil and South Korea, and Adobe for also sponsoring the event! Hope to see you all next year!

Web Engines Hackfest 2014 sponsors: Adobe, Collabora and Igalia

Web Engines Hackfest 2014 sponsors: Adobe, Collabora and Igalia

QtWebKit is no more, what now?

Driven by the technical choices of some of our early clients, QtWebKit was one of the first web engines Collabora worked on, building the initial support for NPAPI plugins and more. Since then we had kept in touch with the project from time to time when helping clients with specific issues, hardware or software integration, and particularly GStreamer-related work.

With Google forking Blink off WebKit, a decision had to be made by all vendors of browsers and platform APIs based on WebKit on whether to stay or follow Google instead. After quite a bit of consideration and prototyping, the Qt team decided to take the second option and build the QtWebEngine library to replace QtWebKit.

The main advantage of WebKit over Blink for engine vendors is the ability to implement custom platform support. That meant QtWebKit was able to use Qt graphics and networking APIs and other Qt technologies for all of the platform-integration needs. It also enjoyed the great flexibility of using GStreamer to implement HTML5 media. GStreamer brings hardware-acceleration capabilities, support for several media formats and the ability to expand that support without having to change the engine itself.

People who are using QtWebKit because of its being Gstreamer-powered will probably be better served by switching to one of the remaining GStreamer-based ports, such as WebKitGTK+. Those who don’t care about the underlying technologies but really need or want to use Qt APIs will be better served by porting to the new QtWebEngine.

It’s important to note though that QtWebEngine drops support for Android and iOS as well as several features that allowed tight integration with the Qt platform, such as DOM manipulation through the QWebElement APIs, making QObject instances available to web applications, and the ability to set the QNetworkAccessManager used for downloading resources, which allowed for fine-grained control of the requests and sharing of cookies and cache.

It might also make sense to go Chromium/Blink, either by using the Chrome Content API, or switching to one its siblings (QtWebEngine included) if the goal is to make a browser which needs no integration with existing toolkits or environments. You will be limited to the formats supported by Chrome and the hardware platforms targeted by Google. Blink does not allow multiple implementations of the platform support layer, so you are stuck with what upstream decides to ship, or with a fork to maintain.

It is a good alternative when Android itself is the main target. That is the technology used to build its main browser. The main advantage here is you get to follow Chrome’s fast-paced development and great support for the targeted hardware out of the box. If you need to support custom hardware or to be flexible on the kinds of media you would like to support, then WebKit still makes more sense in the long run, since that support can be maintained upstream.

At Collabora we’ve dealt with several WebKit ports over the years, and still actively maintain the custom WebKit Clutter port out of tree for clients. We have also done quite a bit of work on Chromium-powered projects. Some of the decisions you have to make are not easy and we believe we can help. Not sure what to do next? If you have that on your plate, get in touch!

The Blocks C extension and GIO asynchronous calls

So, I intended to be completely away from my computer during my vacations, but hey. I have been interested in this new extension Apple added to the C language a little while ago which introduces the equivalent of closures to C. Today I spent a few minutes looking into it and writing a few tests with the help of clang.

Here’s something I came up with, to use a block as the callback for a GIO asynchronous call:

[sourcecode language=”cpp”]
#include <Block.h>
#include <gio/gio.h>

typedef void (^Block)();

static void async_result_cb(GObject* source,
GAsyncResult* res,
gpointer data)
{
Block block = (Block)data;
block(res);
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
g_type_init();

if (argc != 2) {
g_error("Blah.");
return 1;
}

GMainLoop* loop = g_main_loop_new(NULL, TRUE);
GFile* file = g_file_new_for_path(argv[1]);

g_file_query_info_async(file,
G_FILE_ATTRIBUTE_STANDARD_CONTENT_TYPE,
G_FILE_QUERY_INFO_NONE, G_PRIORITY_DEFAULT,
NULL, async_result_cb, (gpointer) ^ (GAsyncResult* res) {
GError* error = NULL;
GFileInfo* info = g_file_query_info_finish(file, res, &error);

if (error) {
g_error("Failed: %s", error->message);
g_error_free(error);
return;
}

g_message("Content Type: %s",
g_file_info_get_attribute_string(info, G_FILE_ATTRIBUTE_STANDARD_CONTENT_TYPE));

g_object_unref(info);
g_main_loop_quit(loop);
});

g_main_loop_run(loop);
g_object_unref(file);

return 0;
}
[/sourcecode]

Pretty neat, don’t you think? To build you need to use clang and have the blocks runtime installed (libblocksruntime-dev in Debian). Here’s the command I use:

$ clang -fblocks -o gio gio.c -lBlocksRuntime `pkg-config --cflags --libs gio-2.0`

AIClass and vacations

One of my side projects for these last months was to enroll on the online Introduction to AI class, with Peter Norvig and Sebastian Thrun, professors at Stanford. Through it I also learned about the Kahn Academy. I must say that getting to know these efforts made me feel similar to when I found Free Software: it’s hard to believe that such great things exist!

I learned some really cool stuff, and was also introduced to the amazing work of Sebastian Thrun with self-driving cars, it was an awesome experience! Last weekend I took the final exam, and today I got the certificate of accomplishment. It was delivered as a signed PDF which can be checked with a certificate they provided, pretty neat. I’m very happy, and motivated to enroll on more such courses in the future =). Now it’s time to cool down, though. My vacations start today, and on the weekend I’ll travel to the sunny Fortaleza, in northeastern Brazil, to enjoy some nice beaches and get some tan. See you next year!

Statement of Accomplishment - AIClass 2011
Statement of Accomplishment - AIClass 2011

WebKitGTK+ hackfest \o/

It’s been a couple days since I returned from this year’s WebKitGTK+ hackfest in A Coruña, Spain. The weather was very nice, not too cold and not too rainy, we had great food, great drinks and I got to meet new people, and hang out with old friends, which is always great!

Hackfest black board, photo by Mario
I think this was a very productive hackfest, and as usual a very well organized one! Thanks to the GNOME Foundation for the travel sponsorship, to our friends at Igalia for doing an awesome job at making it happen, and to Collabora for sponsoring it and granting me the time to go there! We got a lot done, and although, as usual, our goals list had many items not crossed, we did cross a few very important ones. I took part in discussions about the new WebKit2 APIs, got to know the new design for GNOME’s Web application, which looks great, discussed about Accelerated Compositing along with Joone, Alex, Nayan and Martin Robinson, hacked libsoup a bit to port the multipart/x-mixed-replace patch I wrote to the awesome gio-based infrastructure Dan Winship is building, and some random misc.

The biggest chunk of time, though, ended up being devoted to a very uninteresting (to outsiders, at least), but very important task: making it possible to more easily reproduce our test results. TL;DR? We made our bots’ and development builds use jhbuild to automatically install dependencies; if you’re using tarballs, don’t worry, your usual autogen/configure/make/make install have not been touched. Now to the more verbose version!

The need

Our three build slaves reporting a few failures
For a couple years now we have supported an increasingly complex and very demanding automated testing infrastructure. We have three buildbot slaves, one provided by Collabora (which I maintain), and two provided by Igalia (maintained by their WebKitGTK+ folks). Those bots build as many check ins as possible with 3 different configurations: 32 bits release, 64 bits release, and 64 bits debug.

In addition to those, we have another bot called the EWS, or Early Warning System. There are two of those at this moment: one VM provided by Collabora and my desktop, provided by myself. These bots build every patch uploaded to the bugzilla, and report build failures or passes (you can see the green bubbles). They are very important to our development process because if the patch causes a build failure for our port people can often know that before landing, and try fixes by uploading them to bugzilla instead of doing additional commits. And people are usually very receptive to waiting for EWS output and acting on it, except when they take way too long. You can have an idea of what the life of an EWS bot looks like by looking at the recent status for the WebKitGTK+ bots.

Maintaining all of those bots is at times a rather daunting task. The tests require a very specific set of packages, fonts, themes and icons to always report the same size for objects in a render. Upgrades, for instance, had to be synchronized, and usually involve generating new baselines for a large number of tests. You can see in these instructions, for instance, how strict the environment requirements are – yes, we need specific versions of fonts, because they often cause layouts to change in size! At one point we had tests fail after a compiler upgrade, which made rounding act a bit different!

So stability was a very important aspect of maintaining these bots. All of them have the same version of Debian, and most of the packages are pinned to the same version. On the other hand, and in direct contradition to the stability requirement, we often require bleeding edge versions of some libraries we rely on, such as libsoup. Since we started pushing WebKitGTK+ to be libsoup-only, its own progress has been pretty much driven by WebKitGTK+’s requirements, and Dan Winship has made it possible to make our soup backend much, much simpler and way more featureful. That meant, though, requiring very recent versions of soup.

To top it off, for anyone not running Debian testing and tracking the exact same versions of packages as the bots it was virtually impossible to get the tests to pass, which made it very difficult for even ourselves to make sure all patches were still passing before committing something. Wow, what a mess.

The explosion^Wsolution

So a few weeks back Martin Robinson came up with a proposed solution, which, as he says, is the “nuclear bomb” solution. We would have a jhbuild environment which would build and install all of the dependencies necessary for reproducing the test expectations the bots have. So over the first three days of the hackfest Martin and myself hacked away in building scripts, buildmaster integration, a jhbuild configuration, a jhbuild modules file, setting up tarballs, and wiring it all in a way that makes it convenient for the contributors to get along with. You’ll notice that our buildslaves now have a step just before compiling called “updated gtk dependencies” (gtk is the name we use for our port in the context of WebKit), which runs jhbuild to install any new dependencies or version bumps we added. You can also see that those instructions I mentioned above became a tad simpler.

It took us way more time than we thought for the dust to settle, but it eventually began to. The great thing of doing it during the hackfest was that we could find and fix issues with weird configurations on the spot! Oh, you build with AR_FLAGS=cruT and something doesn’t like it? OK, we fix it so that the jhbuild modules are not affected by that variable. Oh, turns out we missed a dependency, no problem, we add it to the modules file or install them on the bots, and then document the dependency. I set up a very clean chroot which we could use for trying out changes so as to not disrupt the tree too much for the other hackfest participants, and I think overall we did good.

The aftermath

By the time we were done our colleagues who ran other distributions such as Fedora were already being able to get a substantial improvements to the number of tests passing, and so did we! Also, the ability to seamlessly upgrade all the bots with a simple commit made it possible for us to very easily land a change that required a very recent (as in unreleased) version of soup which made our networking backend way simpler. All that red looks great, doesn’t it? And we aren’t done yet, we’ll certainly be making more tweaks to this infrastructure to make it more transparent and more helpful to the users (contributors and other people interested in running the tests).

If you’ve been hit by the instability we caused, sorry about that, poke mrobinson or myself in the #webkitgtk+ IRC channel on FreeNode, and we’ll help you out or fix any issues. If you haven’t, we hope you enjoy all the goodness that a reproducible testing suite has to offer! That’s it for now, folks, I’ll have more to report on follow-up work started at the hackfest soon enough, hopefully =).

Accelerated Compositing in webkit-clutter

For a while now my fellow Collaboran Joone Hur has been working on implementing the Accelerated Compositing infrastructure available in WebKit in webkit-clutter, so that we can use Clutter’s powers for compositing separate layers and perform animations. This work is being done by Collabora and is sponsored by BOSCH, whom I’d like to thank! What does all this mean, you ask? Let me tell me a bit about it.

The way animations usually work in WebKit is by repainting parts of the page every few milliseconds. What that means in technical terms is that an area of the page gets invalidated, and since the whole page is one big image, all of the pieces that are in that part of the page have to be repainted: the background, any divs, images, text that are at that part of the page.

What the accelerated compositing code paths allow is the creation of separate pieces to represent some of the layers, allowing the composition to happen on the GPU, removing the need to perform lots of cairo paint operations per second in many cases. So if we have a semi-transparent video moving around the page, we can have that video be a separate texture that is layered on top of the page, made transparent and animated by the GPU. In webkit-clutter’s case this is done by having separate actors for each of the layers.

I have been looking at this code on and off, and recently joined Joone in the implementation of some of the pieces. The accelerated compositing infrastructure was originally built by Apple and is, for that reason, works in a way that is very similar to Core Animation. The code is still a bit over the place as we work on figuring out how to best translate the concepts into clutter concepts and there are several bugs, but some cool demos are already possible! Bellow you have one of the CSS3 demos that were made by Apple to demo this new functionality running on our MxLauncher test browser.

You can also see that the non-Accelerated version is unable to represent the 3D space correctly. Also, can you guess which of the two MxLauncher instances is spending less CPU? ;) In this second video I show the debug borders being painted around the actors that were created to represent layers.

The code, should you like to peek or test is available in the ac2 branch of our webkit-clutter repository: http://gitorious.org/webkit-clutter/webkit-clutter/commits/ac2

We still have plenty of work to do, so expect to hear more about it. During our annual hackfest in A Coruña we plan to discuss how this work could be integrated also in the WebKitGTK+ port, perhaps by taking advantage of clutter-gtk, which would benefit both ports, by sharing code and maintenance, and providing this great functionality to Epiphany users. Stay tuned!

WebKitGTK+ hackfest 2010!

Last week I attended the WebKitGTK+ 2010 hackfest. It was a great opportunity to meet up with the other developers, discuss some plans for the future, hack away at WebKitGTK+. But, most importantly, play Street Figher 2 =). Thanks to Collabora and Igalia for sponsoring the hackfest, Igalia for hosting and organizing it (well done!), and the GNOME foundation for having sponsored my trip to Coruña!

Unlike last year we didn’t find any big design issues hurting our work (page cache, I’m looking at you!) on new futures. I also didn’t have any huge plans for new API, although we did manage to get some new stuff in there, like the plugins management API Xan created, and the further work done by Dan in soup. This meant, from my point of view the hackfest has been a great oportunity to look at refactorings that we could do to further simplify understanding the code, changing it, and even sharing it =). Besides pushing the debian packaging of the 1.3.x series a bit further.

Coruña was great as always, and I enjoyed going around, eating and hacking there, although I got a cold on the last days which kinda hindered my ability to stare at the screen for too long, some times. Now that I’m at the hot brazilian summer again I’ll hopefully get better soon =)

Cheers \o/

Sponsored by the GNOME Foundation